window treatments

A Peek at Recent Projects - Part 2

Monday we shared a recent dining room project with you. And today we are sharing a second project, a family room, that was completed earlier this year for some other lovely clients of ours. This project was a fairly large sized family room, but the design challenge here was that the space needed to accommodate several zones, or areas of different function - a tv watching area, a work space, and a children's play space. But, challenge accepted.. we were able to create and delineate these specific zones and still make the space feel open and cohesive. With a beautifully functional layout of space and a clean bold color palette, this space is one of my favorites this year! Take a look!


Family room view of ottomans


This family room got a pretty significant over-haul from top to bottom. The design included new bamboo flooring, freshly painted walls, and all new furnishings.. and I mean all! I don't believe any single piece of furniture, window treatment, etc. remained from the original space. These truly are the best kinds of projects - when we get to start from a blank canvas, so to speak. And, the transformation is always so much more rewarding for the client! Check out the snapshot below of the space before with seafoam blue carpeting, a slightly lighter seafoam blue wall color, and an assortment of tired old furnishings. What a difference, right?


Before image


Anyway, here's a few more sneak peek photos of the project, but definitely check out the portfolio page in the near future for more shots of this bright and fresh space. The clean lines of this large transitional sectional paired with pops of vibrant color in the pillows and bold pattern in the rug really create a dynamic space.


Family room side table view


This project actually lasted quite a long time.. with client decisions, contractor schedules, oh and me having a baby, I think this project stretched over almost 9 months. But, we had a ton of fun working on this project and, at the completion of the project, I even joked with the clients about how we are going to miss our Friday night date night.. uhem, I mean Friday night design meetings. =) They became such a staple in my week. Anyway, in pulling these photos together for the portfolio, I realized I miss something else from the days of this project...


Logan wearing Hayes


I miss my tiny little baby! This photo of Logan wearing Hayes was taken during installation of this project. Yep, this was Hayes' first time on the job! But I just couldn't believe how tiny and cute he looks here! Now he's a chunky monkey 9 month old. Wow, time flies!

Anyway, back to the project! In the photos below you'll see the three zones I mentioned earlier in the post. The first one shows the small and simple work space that is nestled into a small nook out of the way of the main living area and disguised from view just enough in case the desk ever gets a little messy!


Family room desk view


This next photo shows the children's play area situated perfectly in an alcove at the far end of the space. The clients have two adorable little kiddos and they needed a place to hang out on the floor, sprawl out their toys and just play! The comfy rug and floor pillows give them a soft place to play, and with the simple storage cubbies for all their toys and a cork board to display their artwork, this is the perfect little play space.. and it's stylish too!


Family room view of play area


And this last photo shows the tv watching zone, which from this angle you can also see doubles as a casual sitting area around the fireplace and the built-in bookshelves. With dual focal points, this area gets a ton of use from this family!


Family room view of built-in


Well, there's your sneak peak! Thanks for letting us share. Hope you love this space as much as we, and the clients, do! Check back later this week for one more tiny client project that we'll be sharing with you. And, as always, if you have a space that needs a total transformation, you know where to reach us!

A Peek at Recent Projects - Part 1

After having our beautiful baby boy earlier this year, we took some time away from client work to spend precious time with him. How amazing it has been! And, while we're pretty much back in the swing of working now, I am trying to maintain a delicate balance of work and being home with my son! That's the beauty of working for yourself, right? Anyway, because of that, it has been awhile since we've posted about our client work! Over the past few months, we wrapped up a few design projects, but have just been too busy to share them with you.. until now! So today I'm giving you a sneak peek of the first of three of our most recently completed client projects. The other two projects will follow later this week! These projects will, of course, be added with more detail to our portfolio page soon, but until then, here are a few preview shots of the completed spaces. Enjoy!

This first project is a small dining room space that I designed (on a limited budget) for previous clients of ours. The clients had these really unique heirloom pieces that they wanted to include in the new space, but the challenge was to lighten, brighten, and update the look and feel of the space while incorporating the large scale, heavy, and, in the case of the upholstery - outdated, heirloom pieces. Here is the result!


Dining room window view


A clean, simple, and fresh dining space that feels like an early morning at a cozy bed and breakfast. At least that what comes to mind for me! =)

Anyway, we kept the walls a cheerful pale yellow, and did tone on tone semi-sheer window panels layered over woven shades to soften yet unify the space. We also introduced a soft grey textural fabric for the new upholstery on the heirloom dining chairs!


Dining room side chair view


Which we think is a huge improvement from the dark, outdated upholstery before.. see?


Dining chair upholstery before


Also, to bring in some texture, life, and a little color to the otherwise neutral space, we added some natural earthy elements to the tablescape, which also helped to tie in the adjacent spaces. We did so through the use of muted green round woven placemats and wooden napkin rings!


Dining room table detail


To balance the size and style of the massive sideboard, we added eclectic decor and accessories. Displayed on top are a collection of vintage apothecary jars filled with natural elements, tall architectural candle holders to introduce height, and hung on the wall above is a large scale client-created Instagram photo collage to give the space a casual vibe and personal touch.


Dining room view with sideboard


Well, that's all you get for now! Check out our portfolio page in the near future for more details of this sweet little dining space. The light, airy, casual yet sophisticated feel of this dining room makes it a great space for entertaining friends in a cozy and intimate setting. In fact, our clients have already deemed this the favorite room in the house! Wow. You know, dining rooms don't often get that honor, but I think it's because this space is comfortable, functional, and charming, and its classic style will serve this family for a long time. What a joy it is to help our clients love their spaces!

Later this week, look for a few more of our recent client projects. Happy Monday everyone!

Tuesday Tip - Make the Most of Your Windows

Design tip header.

Tuesday Tip - Make the Most of Your Windows:


Let in more light, open up your space, and feature your windows with a few simple tricks. Try hanging your window treatments at full ceiling height or at least above the window frame. This will draw your eye up and add visual height to the room. Also try hanging them wider than the window frame, which will expand the window, making it seems larger than it really is.


Check out these images below for examples of how to make the windows a true feature in the space!

Ceiling height window treatments.

Open airy window treatments.

Window treatments in bedroom.

Images found here!

Tuesday Tip - Mix It Up!

We love to offer our clients, friends, family, whomever, fun design tips here and there to help them make their homes more interesting, better designed and, overall, just simply beautiful. And, as we introduced here, we are excited to pass these tips along to our blog readers too! Before we got rolling with our design tip series, we've decided to give this little tip sharing idea it's very own persona.. we call it the Tuesday Tip series, and while it may not come to you every Tuesday, you can bet that it will only make an appearance on a Tuesday! =)

And, as I mentioned before, we will file each of these post under there very own category so eventually you can browse all of our Tuesday Tips with one simple click.

So, before this Tuesday is over, lets get this tip started!

Design tip header.

Tuesday Tip - Mix It Up:


Don't be afraid of mixing patterns! It can actually increase the drama and depth of a space - really giving it a layered feel. Think solids, stripes, florals, geometrics, and textures, and go for it! This mix of patterns might be found on a toss pillow, the rug and the window treatments, as shown below!

Image showing mix of patterns.

Image from styleathome.com

DIY Window Cornice

Our last post showed the beginnings of a window cornice DIY project, but we hadn’t showed you the how-to or the result. So, that’s what we are blogging about today. If you’ve got a window that needs a little love, a quick and easy project, that will add some dynamic interest to your space, is just what the design doctor ordered. Okay, that was cheesy, I know!

Anyway, to get started on the project, first you need supplies, right? So, here is a list of what you need (what we used), most of which you probably have lying around the house somewhere.

Supplies:

  • a lovely fabric (we only used a yard and a half, bonus!)
  • batting (same length)
  • a few pieces of wood (you can even use scrap wood, we did!)
  • a tape measure
  • pencil
  • saw (we used a jig saw)
  • drill
  • screws
  • scissors
  • spray adhesive
  • staple gun and staples (light duty works fine)
  • and L-brackets

Once you have all the supplies, follow the simple steps below to cornice creation!

Upholstered Window Cornice How-to

  1. Determine the dimensions. This is a personal design choice and is totally up to you. But, here are a few tips! The cornice should be slightly wider than the window casing, as it will need to fit around it. It can be as tall as you’d like it to be, but just remember to conceal the unsightly window treatment mechanisms (after all, that’s the true purpose of a window cornice). And I would make the depth of the cornice at least 4 inches; again, it will need to allow room for the window casing and any window treatment mechanisms such as the brackets, blinds, rod, etc.

Diagram showing the size of the cornice.

  1. Construct the cornice frame. This is where you'll use the wood, tape measure, pencil, saw, drill and screws. Measure out the dimensions you’ve determined onto the wood and use an accurate saw to cut into four pieces – the face of the cornice (the biggest piece), two side pieces, and a top piece.

The constructed frame for the cornice.

Image showing that the constructed cornice fits into place.

  1. Cut and wrap the batting. Once you have the cornice constructed, lay out the batting and cut the appropriate amount to cover all three visible sides of the cornice.

Image showing cut batting.

Then, wrap it pretty snug the whole way around. The batting really only needs spray adhesive to attach it to the wood, but you can always use the staple gun just to be sure.

Image showing cornice frame wrapped in batting.

Image showing batting step finished.

  1. Upholster the cornice. Now that the frame and batting are ready, you can start the upholstery part. Yay! Measure twice and cut once the appropriate amount of fabric to cover all three visible sides of the cornice, just like you did with the batting. Quick tip – if your fabric has a pattern (like ours did), make sure you line up the fabric on the cornice to ensure that the finished product will show the portion of pattern you really want. And if it’s striped, you really need to pay attention to aligning it so that the stripes are straight!

Image showing the fabric being cut for the cornice.

Now, it's time for the best, and hardest, part. Start in the center of the cornice. Wrap the fabric and staple one staple on each side, pulling the fabric pretty tight. Work your way outward from there, alternating sides to ensure the face of the cornice is evenly smooth. Do this for the entire cornice. As you come to the sides of the cornice, you may want to cut some of the excess fabric as needed.

Image showing the upholstering of the cornice.

Detail shot of the rolled under edges and the staples.

Here's how it should look when you complete this step!

The finished cornice.

The face of the finished cornice.

  1. Attach L-brackets to the wall. While you are marveling at the beauty of the cornice you’ve just created, prepare the wall for it to be hung. About ¼ of the way in from the outsides of the window casing, screw in two L-brackets that your cornice will rest on.

Logan screwing in the L-brackets.

Image showing the L-bracket placement.

  1. Attach the top frame piece. The top board of the cornice does not need to be upholstered since it will not be visible when hung. Slide the top piece in about ¾ inch down from the top. Make sure you know which is top and bottom, you don’t want to end up hanging the cornice upside-down. Once the top piece is in place, attach it to the upholstered cornice with very small screws (that won’t reach through to the pretty face of the cornice) with small L-brackets (we actually used the same size ones we attached to the wall to hang the cornice).

Logan screwing in the L-brackets on the top piece of the cornice.

Image showing the attached top piece of the cornice.

The finished cornice, before it is hung on the wall.

  1. Hang the cornice, and voila! Slide the cornice into place above the window and reach up under the cornice (it will probably be a tight squeeze) to screw in small screws through the L-brackets that are on the wall, into the top piece of the cornice. That's it!

The finished product hung on the wall.

Image showing the cornice in the space.

So, what do you think? Let us know your thoughts on this project. Does it seem easy enough? Did it improve the look and style of the window?

Well, what really matters is that we love it. And we do! It added that extra layer that was missing. Now, we only have to add a few (or more.. haha) layers - we're thinking backsplash, lighting, etc. We'll be bringing you more DIY projects soon!

Fabric Find

So, I mentioned in a recent post that I had picked up a great fabric that I just happened to find (while not looking for it.. bonus!). But I hadn’t told you much more than that. So, this post will fill you in! First, here are few pics of the lovely fabric!

Image of fabric.

Close-up of fabric.

Even closer close-up of fabric.

While I would probably say my style is more modern than traditional, I would rather say I’m eclectic! To me, it doesn’t necessarily matter the style of something, but more so if you like it and/or if it works within your space. And, that’s where this fabric comes in. It’s sort of a modern take on a traditional pattern – so it’s very crisp and clean but has a bit of whimsy. Also, the color palette is quite current/modern and, while it has many colors, it reads very subtle, and that’s just what I love about it.

Anyway, as soon as I saw the fabric hanging from the store rack, I envisioned it in our kitchen. Every color in this fabric feels like it belongs in our muted blue-green and light ivory kitchen. And although I wasn’t sure how I was going to bring this fabric into the space at that moment, I knew I’d find a purpose. Fabrics can be used in endless ways to layer a room!

Here are a few pics of the fabric in the space. See how seamlessly it works with the kitchen color scheme and how it starts to pull the space together. Love it!

Fabric shown laying on the counter.

Fabric shown next to wall color and counter top.

Close-up photo of the fabric and wall color.

Fabric shown next to vintage tins.

Anyway, after tossing around a few ideas for this fabric in this space (ie. upholstered cork board, upholstered window cornice, café-style window treatments, table runner, etc.), we decided that while we already have the white wooden blinds for privacy on the window above our kitchen sink, it definitely needed another layer!

Here’s a few shots of the window with just the blinds!

Window over the sink with white wooden blinds.

Close-up of white wooden blinds.

Needs some interest right? So, we decided to go with the cornice idea! It’s an easy DIY project, yet it will add a ton of sophistication and style!

Check back soon for our handy how-to and the final result!